Lynn Goldsmith’s Streets of New York at The Morrison Hotel Gallery

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Mike Malone

Michael Malone is everyone's Aunt Barbara, he holds a BA in Classical Archaeology & Civilizations, is a self-admitted adult groupie & music geek. He is a sharp dancer & snazzy dresser. He's attended 50+ B-52s concerts and has spent the better part of the last 15 years working in advertising & media.

Snapshots of Rock & Roll’s elite as well as the city they have inhabited were on display last night at the opening of Lynn Goldsmith’s Streets of New York at The Morrison Hotel Gallery. Lynn is one of rock and roll’s premiere photographers, chronicling musicians and their lives over the last forty years. This exhibition was a nod to both the famous & infamous as well as the city which Lynn captured them playing & posing. Almost as interesting as seeing some of the my favorite musicians, was seeing the transformation and evolution of New York City over four decades. Whether it was the xrated movie theaters of 42nd Street, the vintage cars or the places that are no more. I have an extreme affinity towards the underground punk and new waves scene of New York of the late 1970’s into the early 1980’s, so for me getting a glimpse into this time and place was a real treat. NYC has been host to some of the world’s most popular music venues as well as musicians and the gallery walls reflected that. From Debbie Harry to Bruce Springsteen, The Talking Heads to The Pretenders, My all-time favorite band, The B-52s to The Beastie Boys, the exhibit showcased the diverse musical tastes, genres and faces that have made New York City the music mecca of the world. A few highlights for me was a shot of The Pretenders outside of Cell 54, The B-52’s posed quite dramatically outside a luncheonette, The Talking Heads standing under a highway overpass and the pairing of Joey Ramone and Allen Ginsburg. Aside from musicians there were some pop culture and random photos that captured a time and feel of the city. One that really spoke to a bygone era of NYC was Turkey Man. Anyone who has ever been to NYC is surely familiar with the street performers that roam the streets. Turkey Man captured one of these street performers dressed as a giant turkey, jumping mid-air in the midst of gridlock traffic on a street littered with x-rated movie theaters. All of these elements speak to the city’s personality and grit and all of these combined elements enabled the viewer to feel and recall a time and place in the city that is long gone. The exhibition did a fine job of illustrating the city’s musical roots and the effect musicians have played on the city and vice versa and it was easy to see Lynn’s passion and deep connection to both the musicians & people she photographed as well as the city she made her home.

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The following two tabs change content below.
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Mike Malone

Michael Malone is everyone's Aunt Barbara, he holds a BA in Classical Archaeology & Civilizations, is a self-admitted adult groupie & music geek. He is a sharp dancer & snazzy dresser. He's attended 50+ B-52s concerts and has spent the better part of the last 15 years working in advertising & media.
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Michael Malone is everyone's Aunt Barbara, he holds a BA in Classical Archaeology & Civilizations, is a self-admitted adult groupie & music geek. He is a sharp dancer & snazzy dresser. He's attended 50+ B-52s concerts and has spent the better part of the last 15 years working in advertising & media.

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